Community
Published: June 15, 2018
Community
Published: June 15, 2018

Making Science Even More Fun in the Netherlands

We are proud to announce that we have been involved in developing the Chemistry module for the Maakkunde method, part of the Science and Technology scheme at NEMO Science Museum in Amsterdam. We’ve been a partner of NEMO since 2014, supporting their learning facility through community engagement grant.

Investigative Learning

NEMO has introduced a constructive teaching method called Maakkunde (Dutch for ‘Engineer’) to improve science and technology education for primary school children. This hands-on teaching method includes teacher training courses which are designed to give all teachers the tools, knowledge and skills they need to get started.

The scheme, which consists of 10 modules, brings design and research learning into the educational curriculum. PPG has been working closely with NEMO on the Chemistry module. Two of our employees; Loses van Elven and Patrick Hoogendoorn from our R&D center, produced a fantastic Chemistry inspiration session.

PPG’s feedback and insight has been instrumental in developing the lessons, activities and training courses,” said Lotje van Veersen, NEMO Senior Account manager Development & Partnerships.

Making Chemistry Fun

On the Chemistry course, younger children learn how to make pavement chalk and older children study chemical extraction. Pupils then carry out a mini project to make anti-odor agents. The Chemistry module is vital in teaching students’ various skills, such as problem-solving. The full module is set to be complete by the end of 2018.

Just Try It Out!

The Maakkunde website also offers inspirational activities for anyone to try out, including two on chemistry. There is an exciting experiment where people can use chromatography to separate pigments and learn about purifying medication by separating substances.It has been great working alongside such a fantastic organization and we have relished the opportunity to help advance subjects like science in schools.